Posts by CelticCollegeConsultants

Should You Homeschool High School? (Part 4)

By on Jun 29, 2018 in Blog |

  A LOOK AT FINANCIAL AID BASICS   Financial Aid, Scholarships First things first.  Your child WILL be eligible for federal financial aid, even if s/he earns a non-accredited diploma.  S/He’ll need to file the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) each year, just like all other students. Financial Aid & Scholarships Basics Financial aid and scholarships MUST be applied for.  There are a number of means to do so: financial aid applications, scholarship applications, etc.  Sometimes the student’s application for admissions is also used to determine his or her eligibility for various scholarship programs the school offers.  Sometimes a separate application, or series of applications and/or interviews will be required. IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT EACH COLLEGE’S FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARSHIP WEBSITE BE CAREFULLY REVIEWED.  The particular opportunities, requirements, and deadlines at that institution will be posted.  Some schools have a central scholarships page, sometimes with their own search function, while others have information scattered around.  Scholarships can be given by the university, the college within the university, and/or the academic and athletic departments. Need Based Aid – is comprised of tuition reductions, grants, and loans which are qualified for on the basis of “need.”  In common parlance, anyone whose budget comes up short would be thought to be in need. In the realm of financial aid, there are formuli used to determine need, also known as demonstrated need.  Forms must be completed and submitted by deadlines set by the schools.  For federal student aid, the FAFSA form (fafsa.ed.gov) is the form which qualifies all citizens and legal aliens for federal student aid programs ranging from Pell grants to federal student and parent loan programs.  Colleges award need based federal aid before they award any other aid.  There are a couple of colleges in the country who have opted out of the federal student aid programs.  These schools have their own financial aid programs.  Colleges can also provide need based aid to students.  Many use the FAFSA formula as their guide.  Some colleges and universities also require the CSS PROFILE (profileonline.collegeboard.org) form and/or their own forms.  A few colleges require their own forms. EFC/Expected Family Contribution – is the official amount of money the FAFSA or PROFILE processor determines, based on their formula, that the student and his or her family can pay for one year of college. There...

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Why Hire College Consultants?

By on May 21, 2018 in Blog |

Why Hire College Consultants?Many parents are ecstatic when their children graduate from high school and are about to go to college. You may even have confidence that your child has an idea or knows what they want to study in college. Sadly, this may not be true in most cases. Your child needs guidance in choosing a career path so that they don’t feel overwhelmed or lost to the extent of dropping out. It is also in your best interest to find the right college in order to avoid financial losses and debts. With Celtic College Consultants, you will be able to realize your child’s full potential making their education successful as well as affordable. Some of the benefits that come with hiring college consultants are as follows: The attention given to each family and their child by the Celtic College Consultants is individualized. They have your best interest at heart and will ensure that your child gets the opportunity to explore the best colleges and education options. You will have peace of mind. There is nothing as unsettling as trying to find the right college for your child. What’s even more stressful is finding a way to finance your child’s college education. With the help of reputable college consultants, you do not have to stress yourself out with all these issues. By scheduling a meeting with them, these experienced consultants will be able to find the right college for your child, find an affordable way to finance your child’s education and guide your child in choosing the best career path. The college application process might be complicated, especially if it is your first time. With the help of experienced college consultants, you will be guided in the right direction. You might not know the best time to apply for college and this is another area where the expertise of the consultants will come in...

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SHOULD YOU HOMESCHOOL HIGH SCHOOL? (PART 1)

By on May 17, 2018 in Blog |

  AN OVERVIEW OF TESTING INCLUDING THE ACT, SAT, CLT, & MORE   INTRODUCTION In this series of articles I will address a number of factors of high school education from a college admissions perspective. As a Catholic homeschooling mother of six and a professional college consultant, I will share some of my experience and knowledge in this series of four articles. In this first article, I’ll discuss the overall perspective colleges have with regard to homeschoolers and I’ll explore the various tests that are often part of the high school experience. In the second article, I’ll examine the various types of courses high school students can take. Next, athletics, extracurricular activities, and leadership will be the focus of the article. In the final article, financial aid, scholarships, and college funding topics will be addressed. My goal is to educate families through these articles so that you can prayerfully make the best decision for your children. Each child and family is different. Out of respect for that, I seek to provide information, not to persuade you to a particular action when I do not know your situation.   NOT SURE WHETHER YOUR STUDENT(S) IS/ARE COLLEGE BOUND? What if you aren’t sure that college will be the appropriate path after high school for your child(ren)? At this stage, it is important to both keep the various higher education options open as well as foster the emerging interests and inclinations of our children. If you aren’t certain, proceed in a manner that leaves college as an option. However, if it is already clear that a different path will best serve your child(ren), skip the academically focused sections of this series and focus your attention on the other sections. Explore the certificate and apprenticeship programs available in your area and in your child(ren)’s area(s) of interest. The Occupation Outlook Handbook found on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website, bls.gov, will be helpful when researching any prospective careers’ expected growth and pay ranges.   HOMESCHOOLED STUDENTS ARE WELCOME ON CAMPUS! Before going any further, it’s important to make it clear that homeschooled students are welcome on college campuses. Many admissions offices have special instructions and/or admissions counselors just for homeschooled students. On campus,...

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SHOULD YOU HOMESCHOOL HIGH SCHOOL? (PART 2)

By on May 17, 2018 in Blog |

  HS COURSE OPTIONS INCLUDING AP AND DUAL ENROLLMENT   INTRODUCTION In this series of articles I will address a number of factors of high school education from a college admissions perspective. As a Catholic homeschooling mother of six and a professional college consultant, I will share some of my experience and knowledge in this series of four articles. In the first article, I discussed the overall perspective colleges have with regard to homeschoolers and the various tests that are often part of the high school experience. In this article, I’ll examine the various types of courses high school students can take. Next time, athletics, extracurricular activities, and leadership will be the focus of the article. In the final article, financial aid, scholarships, and college funding topics will be addressed. My goal is to educate families so that they can prayerfully make the best decision for their children. Each child and family is different. Out of respect for that, I seek to provide information, not to persuade the reader to a particular action. Not surprisingly, academics are the most important qualifications for college entrance and success. Students will present their academic credentials to their prospective colleges in a number of ways. The courses chosen, grades earned, and test scores earned are the main ways academic credentials are presented through the admissions process. The various tests were addressed in the last article; we’ll explore course options in this one. HIGH SCHOOL COURSES Homeschooled students have an advantage over traditionally schooled students because they have access to a limitless number of classes on various topics. In order to capitalize on this opportunity, it’s essential to know your child’s needs and find the appropriate courses and opportunities for him or her. This requires effort, good communication with your child, excellent organizational skills, and, sometimes, outside assistance. Without a focus, however, selecting and prioritizing courses (and diploma programs) is impossible and there’s no choice but to guess or “go with the flow.” Customization Options Abound Homeschooling families have the opportunity to tailor the curriculum of each student child according to his or her needs no matter their academic strengths and weaknesses, learning styles, or the extent of their extracurricular pursuits. Homeschoolers can take...

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SHOULD YOU HOMESCHOOL HIGH SCHOOL? (PART 3)

By on May 17, 2018 in Blog |

  ATHLETICS & SKILLS FOR SUCCESS ON CAMPUS   Continuing our series on aspects to consider, from a college prep perspective, when considering whether to homeschool high school or not, we here consider athletic participation and college recruitment, various “soft” skills students need to develop during the high school years in order to be successful on campus, and how to stay Catholic while in college. ATHLETICS It IS possible for homeschooled athletes to be recruited by a college team. Although the NCAA reminds us that only 2% of high school athletes win athletic scholarships, it IS possible. There are two aspects to consider: being seen by coaches and becoming and maintaining academic eligibility. Sometimes homeschooled students can play on the public high school’s team. Sometimes they are recruited through their club teams or other avenues. Student athletes must register with NCAA and NAIA eligibility centers, both of which have guidelines for homeschooled students to follow in order to be eligible to be recruited. Check the guidelines early on and frequently to ensure that the curricula and courses you choose meet the guidelines. In reality, most college coaches don’t waste their time watching high school athletics; they watch club athletes. If you are in a good club, you’ll be seen by plenty of coaches. In general, nonetheless, you need to be proactive about promoting yourself and letting coaches know of your athletic abilities. With the new rules, they won’t be able to reach out to you until junior year but that doesn’t stop you from reaching out to them every month or two to keep them updated about your activities and accomplishments. They can keep an eye out for you when they are observing. It’s essential that athletes train well. Perhaps you can join an adult team or work out with another team in your club. You may be able to compete at “open events,” especially for track, cross country, tennis, and swimming events. Another option, of course, is the local gym.   MATURITY & LIFE SKILLS Colleges are reporting a number of characteristics of freshman that are making it difficult for them to be successful. Each student’s strengths and weaknesses and situations differ from their peers, no matter how...

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