Posts by CelticCollegeConsultants

Why You Should Hire A College Advisor

By on May 10, 2018 in Blog |

Why you should hire a college advisorWhy get independent college consultants to help you with college application? Here are the advantages: Expertise The college application process is not as easy as it once was. There are a number of things you and your child need to do for you to maximize the chances of college acceptance. You will need to have an activity list in place in order to beat deadlines. In a highly competitive world where only the best and smartest thrive, your child will need to have a competitive edge against the rest. The insights and invaluable advice of your college consultant will help you develop a great strategy for college applications thus increasing your child’s chances of acceptance into college. Reduce Stress Levels. If your child is in senior year of high school, you will constantly be asking a myriad of questions. Did you get your transcripts? How many college applications have you sent today? Did you ask your teachers for recommendations? If this sounds like you, it would be wise to enlist the help of Celtic College Consultants. AvailabilityCollege applications are as time-consuming as they are complicated. Your consultant will give you all the help that you need. Are you on your way to work and you suddenly have to know whether your child needs to register for an SAT test? Your consultant is simply a call away. You can call and get all the answers you need. Cost Saving Even though you will spend money hiring a college consultant, you will save much more. Your college consultant will locate the best-fit colleges for your child. Using their vast knowledge in college applications, they will create a college list that will tick the boxes of your child’s preferences. This will help you avoid wasting resources in the future in terms of transfers or worse, your child dropping out as a result of picking out the wrong...

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How Many College Applications Do You Need to Fill Out?

By on Apr 13, 2018 in Blog |

How Many College Applications Do You Need to Fill Out? The college admission process is very competitive, and students need to make sure they make their applications correctly. Proper planning is needed when choosing and applying to colleges. One question students ask is, “How many colleges do I need to apply?” You may think that applying to dozens of colleges places you in a better position to get admission to a higher learning institution, but that could be something misleading. You don’t want to spend all of your time making too many applications that don’t offer you a chance to get admission. It’s better to learn about the college application and admission process and how it works before you make your steps. While there is no magic number of colleges to apply, depending on your record and circumstance, probably five to eight applications are enough. The list you make for colleges to apply needs to be based on research and whether or not the institution offers the programs and courses you want to study. Your financial need is another thing to put into consideration. Your academic and social needs can again help decide, which college to apply for admission. You want to choose at least two colleges that provide little chance of rejection meaning you are almost certain that your application will be accepted. The choice you make here may be based on academic and financial safety. Sometimes, you may have a college that you would be happy to attend but because of other factors, there is the likelihood that you may not get admission. This may happen if the selection criterion is too stiff or if the applications received by the colleges are too many. You may consider applying to two or so colleges that you think can accept your application, though not certain. If your qualifications fall slightly short of or don’t match those of the college’s average, it doesn’t mean that you cannot apply. You may apply to such colleges because you never know, you may be selected as one of the candidates to study there. Talk to a college consulting firm like Celtic College Consultants to help you maneuver the college application and admission...

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3 Ways to Make Better Study Notes

By on Mar 2, 2018 in Blog |

3 Ways to Make Better Study NotesOne great way to prepare for exams and even excel in high school and college is to learn how to make great study notes, and unfortunately, this is one of the skills most students do not really consciously develop. To help you make great use of the time that you have, here are 3 ways that you can improve your study notes. Write Study Notes, Not Transcripts!This is the biggest mistake students make whenever they write down notes. The sad thing is that this continues even during college! Students just write down every word that comes out of the mouth of the teachers or instructors. Studies have shown that making notes is as mentally taxing as playing chess and that the more mental space you use for writing down every word, the less mental space is used for understanding the lesson itself. Write the Notes Smarter, Not Harder The right way to take down notes is to just write down phrases or comprehensive sentences, instead of paragraphs of words and numbers. A good rule of thumb is that during class you spend 80% listening and understanding and 20% writing down notes. You should write down the important details. For instance, you should write the following down: Definitions Lists Ideas that are repeated Facts Examples New Vocabulary Analysis and applications Explanations Write in a Structured MannerMake sure that your notes are legible and understandable; there is a big chance that you will go back to your notes to study especially during college. A legible study note is a good study note since it will lessen the mental effort in studying since lesser mental resources are needed to recognize what you are seeing and more focus on memorizing and understanding. If you or your children need assistance in choosing a good college, be it for financial reasons or personal tastes, Celtic College Consultants can help you find your way to academic...

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How to Use your PSAT Score to Find Scholarships

By on Jan 30, 2018 in Blog |

Recently, the College Board modified their scoring system such that the PSAT score is now an estimate of your SAT score.  There are numerous tables available to help you convert the SAT to an ACT or CLT score.  With this information, there is a lot that can be done. Identify Prospective Colleges Identify Possible Academic Merit Scholarships Strategically plan out your testing schedule for the rest of high school Set Goals for SAT & ACT &CLT scores Decide when and whether to take SAT subject tests Decide whether or not to take AP courses in the future For now, we’ll focus on: How to you use test scores to look for scholarships There are two major types of scholarships.  First there are private scholarships, which are those scholarships offered by private organizations like Coca Cola, Walmart, etc.  Most of these scholarships require essays or projects to be prepared and submitted along with an application.  Careful research to identify and track these opportunities needs to be done.  Tracking the scholarships you may be eligible for you will be key to accumulating funds for college.  Be aware, however, that private scholarships are considered resources by the financial aid eligibility calculators; they reduce need based aid dollar for dollar.  Consequently, determination of that impact needs to be done first. The other type of scholarship is called institutional scholarships. These scholarhsips come from the colleges and universities themselves.  The good news is that they comprise 93% of the scholarship dollars and, since they are the colleges’ own funds, can be distributed as the colleges wish. Remember the middle 50% of test scores we discussed earlier?  Let’s take a look at a few examples from Every Catholic’s Guide to College, a college guide I compiled for practicing Catholics (available on Amazon.com).  Like all college guides, it includes a great deal of information for each college, including the middle 50% of the test scores. Arizona State University 510-630/520-640 or 23-28 Drake University 520-670/550- 690 or 24-30 Ferris State University 19-24 or 910–1110 combined SAT New York University 610–710/630–740 or 28-32 The evidence based reading & writing score is always listed first, followed by the math score.  Be aware that some places are still using the old CR/M notation.  When the College Board revised the SAT, the critical...

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Why Our Kids Can’t Work Their Way Through College Like We Did

By on Sep 28, 2017 in Blog |

Recently, Julie Mack wrote an excellent article  (What many older people don’t realize about college costs today).  She points out (with great charts!) a number of factors that contribute to the challenge high school students face today.  In the ‘60s, ’70s, and ‘80s, students could work their way through college.  However, that opportunity is no longer available.  Let’s look, briefly, at why. Tuition was considerably cheaper.  It has quadrupled, even after factoring in inflation.  For public universities, approximately 70% of their funds came from state funding.  Now, only 23% do. Adjusted for inflation, the 2001 Michigan state subsidy was 68% greater than the 2017 subsidy.  The Michigan House Fiscal Agency calculated that between 60% and 80% of the tuition increases between 2000 and 2013 could be attributed to cuts in state funding. Financial aid is different now.  In 1975, loans comprised 17% of financial aid.  Now, federal loans account for 42% of aid (some sources report an even higher percentage.)  The maximum Pell grant in 1975 covered ALL of tuition AND some room and board expenses.  The current maximum Pell grant will cover less than half of the tuition costs at a public university. Social Securitystopped paying benefits to students who had lost a parent in 1982.  In 1975, Social Security paid more money to US college students than Pell grants did.  Scholarship monies have significantly decreased, with some need based scholarships that used to cover full tuition costs now only cover $1,000. Working during college is FAR less lucrative.  The high paying factory jobs collegians could work during the summers and earn enough to cover the next year’s college costs, are gone.  The jobs college students can get now typically pay minimum wage, half (or less) of what students in the 1970s earned.  IIf you are interested in lowering your college costs, I invite you to schedule a consultation with me.  Over the past 13 years working with families all over the US, I have identified the key factors that need to be addressed in order to lower college costs and increase college funding.  My Class of 2017 students were offered over $243,000 each, on average, in college scholarships.  As wonderful as that is, it’s only part of the expertise I bring to each client’s situation.  Working holistically, I am able to guide students to college success.  Here’s how I define that:   ...

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